How to read a patch or diff and understand its structure to apply it manually

by Markus Bertheau, last updated on May 17th, 2013 5 comments »

Hi :)

I wrote this article to show you how patch/diff files store difference information. After reading it you will be able to understand patch files when you read them, better understand certain patch error messages and apply changes manually.

Patch or diff files are just text files, so you can look at them with less or a text editor.

If you prefer to use a terminal, colordiff (in the colordiff package) provides syntax highlighting. If the patch is long, you may want to use less to look at it. You need the -R option for less, or else the colors won’t show. I also always use -S, which will enable horizontal scrolling in less instead of wrapping long lines. The whole command to view a patch with syntax highlighting through less in a terminal is:

markus@ubuntu:~$ cat file.patch | colordiff | less -RS
Patch formats

» Read more: How to read a patch or diff and understand its structure to apply it manually

How to apply a patch/diff and solve “hunk FAILED”, “can’t find file to patch” and others

by Markus Bertheau, last updated on May 17th, 2013 5 comments »

Hi :)

After you read this article, you’ll be able to apply patch files/diffs and deal with possible errors in the process.

Let’s assume the patch is in the file fix-bug.patch (the extension doesn’t matter). The directory software-1.0 contains the files to patch. Applying a patch file/diff then works like this:

  1. Make a backup. On Linux you can use the command:
    markus@ubuntu:~$ cp -a software1.0.before-patch
  2. Run patch (for Windows: patch.exe) like this:
    markus@ubuntu:~$ patch -Np1 -d software-1.0 < fix-bug.patch

Attention: this is patch minus N p digit one, not minus N p small letter L!
» Read more: How to apply a patch/diff and solve “hunk FAILED”, “can’t find file to patch” and others

About running 32 bit programs on 64 bit Ubuntu and shared libraries

by Markus Bertheau, last updated on February 5th, 2013 17 comments »
Quick answer

To run 32-bit programs on 64-bit installations of Ubuntu, install the package ia32-libs:

markus@ubuntu:~$ sudo apt-get install ia32-libs

Long story

I wrote this article to expand your knowledge and understanding of how Linux works. This knowledge should increase your problem solving skills and speed in the area of server administration and command line use. I show how I adapted an installation shell script of a commercial software package, Flash® Media Server, which was written for RedHat Linux, to work on 64-bit Ubuntu Linux. For every symptom that occurs in the process, I explain the problem behind it and how to fix it. The end result is available in Installing Flash® Media Server on Ubuntu Linux.

This article is the first part in a series on the subject. In it I write about running 32 bit programs on 64 bit operating systems and the concept of shared libraries.
» Read more: About running 32 bit programs on 64 bit Ubuntu and shared libraries

Installing Flash® Media Server on Ubuntu Linux

by Markus Bertheau, last updated on February 6th, 2013 24 comments »

Run the following commands to install Flash® Media Server on Ubuntu:

markus@ubuntu:~$ wget markusbe.com/ifu
markus@ubuntu:~$ bash ./install-fms-3.5.3-ubuntu

These commands download and run the install script.

Ubuntu version support

Ubuntu version 32 Bit 64 Bit
10.04 LTS Server Supported Supported
Desktop Supported Supported
9.10 Server Supported Supported
Desktop Supported Supported
9.04 Server Supported Supported
Desktop Supported Supported
8.10 Desktop Supported Supported, but*
8.04 LTS Server Supported Supported, but*
Desktop Supported Supported, but*
6.06 LTS Server Supported Supported, but*

» Read more: Installing Flash® Media Server on Ubuntu Linux

© 2014 Markus Bertheau. All rights reserved.